Tag: social engineering

Verbal Blunders of Political Candidates

As we watch the rating go up and down, spike and plummet, we can see why.  When we analyize this objectively (as I am taking NO political stance here on either side), we are looking at the blunders that should have and could have been avoided with Behavioral Programming methodology.

First up, the Trump repeat.

Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump gives a pair of thumbs up gestures as he enters the Verizon Wireless Arena for a campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire, February 8, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking - RTX262P3
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump gives a pair of thumbs up gestures as he enters the Verizon Wireless Arena for a campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire, February 8, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking – RTX262P3

The candidate: Donald J. Trump, the classiest candidate

The gaffe: Discussing Ted Cruz’s opposition to waterboarding, Trump heard a shout in the audience. “She just said a terrible thing,” Trump said. You know what she said? Shout it out because I don’t want to say.” She did it, but he decided to repeat it anyway. “OK. You’re not allowed to say—and I never expect to hear that from you again,” he impishly scolded. “She said he’s a pussy. That’s terrible. Terrible!” 

We discuss this in depth in the book Behavioral Programming.  It is a social and interpersonal rule breaker to repeat, and raise/give attention and acknowledge an intentional personal attack.  This is discussed in Chapter 21 in the book, the effects of doing this and what the appropriate alternatives are.

This “cackling” from the crowd seems to be somewhat common place during speaches.  In chapter 30 of the book we discuss this and how to stop it.  If you address behavior correctly, others will respond the programming and prevent future instances, even from completely different people.

Chapter 34 of the book also addresses these types of issues.  How to turn a negative comment or situation around to be positive and make you look good and the other person satisfied as well.

Chapter 38 lays out the rules for keeping these types of incidents from happening again.  Deal with an issue once, make it a positive experience, and keep it from happening again.

A huge part of these candidates loosing supporters and poll numbers dropping is due to comments or actions “going viral”.  The word gets around very quickly these days with social media and the news.  Chapter 44 in the book teaches you all about how this social dynamic works, and how to make it work in your favor, or start a revolution against you.

 

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton jokes with patients while visiting the Crossroads rehabilitation facility in Reno, Nevada November 23, 2015. REUTERS/James Glover II - RTX1VIV1
Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton jokes with patients while visiting the Crossroads rehabilitation facility in Reno, Nevada November 23, 2015. REUTERS/James Glover II – RTX1VIV1

The candidate: Hillary Clinton

The gaffe: Perhaps it’s more the denouement of a gaffe. During a Facebook chat Tuesday, journalist-activist Jose Antonio Vargas criticized Clinton for referring to people who are in the country without official status as “illegal immigrants.” In response, she pledged to quit using the term.

The defense: The debate over how to refer to this group of people is heated and hardly resolved. The Associated Press, for example, in 2013 dropped “illegal immigrant” but also banned “undocumented immigrant” as imprecise and often untrue.

Why it matters (or doesn’t): In some ways, this is a microcosm of Clinton’s struggles: She comes from the ’60s, a long time ago, and she never seems so out of touch as when she deploys terminology that used to be acceptable but isn’t anymore. She also seems to periodically misstep, annoying progressives who don’t entirely trust her.

 

Here was have what is a problem for everyone.  Word choice.  What words and terms should we be using.  Throughout the entire book we discuss words and verbiage that are appropriate for all audience and occasions.

In Chapter 18 of the book we discuss in detail word and phrase choices that should be used, and also ones that should never be used. We discuss why, and the effects of using these specific words and phrases.

This whole thing, and many others could have easily been avoided, and issues and bad press avoided, by all candidates.  Chapter 19 would stop most of the bad press each time they open their mouths and talk.  You should learn from them and not make the same mistakes. They could cost you friendships, jobs, opportunities, etc.

Not only the words we choose to use, but the order in which we put them, and the exact way they are phrased, even with the smallest details to you, are interpreted completely different than what you actually meant.  In chapter 36 we discuss this in detail, and make sure you know how to properly phrase what you are trying to convey to the other person. Do not leave room for error or misinterpretation! Make yourself clear by the exact way you phrase your sentences.

Click HERE to get your social life right!

 

 

Behavioral Programming; Four cornerstones for building rapport

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