Tag: psychology

AFECT= Alwood Field Expedient Character Test

How to evaluate peoples character traits, and yours!

What do people know about you that you dont realize about yourself?  How do they use that to influence you without you even knowing?

Below is the chapter from my book Behavioral Programming.  This is how you can quickly determine a persons character type anywhere and anytime!

 

 

Now below is a short video of a TAT test I did, you can listen and think about how YOU would answer these, and what people think about you when you talk about seeminly mundane things every day!

 

 

 

Verbal Blunders of Political Candidates

As we watch the rating go up and down, spike and plummet, we can see why.  When we analyize this objectively (as I am taking NO political stance here on either side), we are looking at the blunders that should have and could have been avoided with Behavioral Programming methodology.

First up, the Trump repeat.

Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump gives a pair of thumbs up gestures as he enters the Verizon Wireless Arena for a campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire, February 8, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking - RTX262P3
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump gives a pair of thumbs up gestures as he enters the Verizon Wireless Arena for a campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire, February 8, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking – RTX262P3

The candidate: Donald J. Trump, the classiest candidate

The gaffe: Discussing Ted Cruz’s opposition to waterboarding, Trump heard a shout in the audience. “She just said a terrible thing,” Trump said. You know what she said? Shout it out because I don’t want to say.” She did it, but he decided to repeat it anyway. “OK. You’re not allowed to say—and I never expect to hear that from you again,” he impishly scolded. “She said he’s a pussy. That’s terrible. Terrible!” 

We discuss this in depth in the book Behavioral Programming.  It is a social and interpersonal rule breaker to repeat, and raise/give attention and acknowledge an intentional personal attack.  This is discussed in Chapter 21 in the book, the effects of doing this and what the appropriate alternatives are.

This “cackling” from the crowd seems to be somewhat common place during speaches.  In chapter 30 of the book we discuss this and how to stop it.  If you address behavior correctly, others will respond the programming and prevent future instances, even from completely different people.

Chapter 34 of the book also addresses these types of issues.  How to turn a negative comment or situation around to be positive and make you look good and the other person satisfied as well.

Chapter 38 lays out the rules for keeping these types of incidents from happening again.  Deal with an issue once, make it a positive experience, and keep it from happening again.

A huge part of these candidates loosing supporters and poll numbers dropping is due to comments or actions “going viral”.  The word gets around very quickly these days with social media and the news.  Chapter 44 in the book teaches you all about how this social dynamic works, and how to make it work in your favor, or start a revolution against you.

 

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton jokes with patients while visiting the Crossroads rehabilitation facility in Reno, Nevada November 23, 2015. REUTERS/James Glover II - RTX1VIV1
Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton jokes with patients while visiting the Crossroads rehabilitation facility in Reno, Nevada November 23, 2015. REUTERS/James Glover II – RTX1VIV1

The candidate: Hillary Clinton

The gaffe: Perhaps it’s more the denouement of a gaffe. During a Facebook chat Tuesday, journalist-activist Jose Antonio Vargas criticized Clinton for referring to people who are in the country without official status as “illegal immigrants.” In response, she pledged to quit using the term.

The defense: The debate over how to refer to this group of people is heated and hardly resolved. The Associated Press, for example, in 2013 dropped “illegal immigrant” but also banned “undocumented immigrant” as imprecise and often untrue.

Why it matters (or doesn’t): In some ways, this is a microcosm of Clinton’s struggles: She comes from the ’60s, a long time ago, and she never seems so out of touch as when she deploys terminology that used to be acceptable but isn’t anymore. She also seems to periodically misstep, annoying progressives who don’t entirely trust her.

 

Here was have what is a problem for everyone.  Word choice.  What words and terms should we be using.  Throughout the entire book we discuss words and verbiage that are appropriate for all audience and occasions.

In Chapter 18 of the book we discuss in detail word and phrase choices that should be used, and also ones that should never be used. We discuss why, and the effects of using these specific words and phrases.

This whole thing, and many others could have easily been avoided, and issues and bad press avoided, by all candidates.  Chapter 19 would stop most of the bad press each time they open their mouths and talk.  You should learn from them and not make the same mistakes. They could cost you friendships, jobs, opportunities, etc.

Not only the words we choose to use, but the order in which we put them, and the exact way they are phrased, even with the smallest details to you, are interpreted completely different than what you actually meant.  In chapter 36 we discuss this in detail, and make sure you know how to properly phrase what you are trying to convey to the other person. Do not leave room for error or misinterpretation! Make yourself clear by the exact way you phrase your sentences.

Click HERE to get your social life right!

 

 

Behavioral Programming working for readers!

I’ve been getting lots of texts and emails regarding my book and how people use it in every day life. I’ve selected a few to share with you to show how varied and widespread it can be used.

BP logo

 

#1 I work in a covert capacity for a law enforcement entity and have worked with a multitude of confidential human sources in the course of my career. There are always challenges in this type of work and Kelly Alwood’s philosophies, in this book Behavioral Programming, speak to those issues with practical and applicable techniques.
One example of application ocurred when I was developing a new human source; we will call her Fatimah. I wanted to identify the best approach to build a rapport with her and determine her potential motivation. Due to time constraints, I needed to recruit her as soon as possible and remembered Kelly’s coined technique of “Brute Force Brain Hacking”, which is often used for a “difficult” target of recruitment but in my case was an issue of limited time. I needed to put a full court press on Fatimah to successfully recruit her without jeopardizing the newly developed rapport. I recalled three techniques from Kelly’s book that I thought would best suit the variables that I was working with; the “four personality traits” (Ch6), a “blitz” version of AFECT (Ch6) and the Reticular Formation (Ch8).
While talking with Fatimah, I pointed out a woman crossing the street carrying numerous bags while also pushing a stroller. Fatimah mentioned that she was probably a single mother who was just looking to make “ends meet” while taking care of her family. Utilizing that information, I was able to quickly ascertain that Fatimah was a Caretaker. After talking further, and using a lot of right-brain language, I found out that Fatimah was a stay-at-home mom, a wife, and a daughter who checked on her parents multiple times a week. This confirmed the personality trait and therefore her motivation: to help others in need. Ultimately, I opened my recruitment pitch by taking the role of being in need of Fatimah’s help and that she was the only person who was in the position to help me. This approach, along with a promise of “assistance”, not money, for her and her family, resulted in a successful recruitment and a successful case outcome.

#2 A common way I apply Behavioral Programming is putting people in a good mood. Almost anyone will respond positively to an observant compliment so that is usually what I go for. This can be anything from mentioning the effort your boss has put into organization to complimenting a girl on her hair. A good example is this morning when my girlfriend was in a bad mood so I told her I was impressed by her dedication to education. The rest of the day went smoothly as a result and the same tactic can be used with nearly anyone with a similar outcome.

 

Behavioral Programming book

#3 I use the approaches in Behavioral Programming literally every single day. The four cornerstones of building rapport are essential to any successful relationship, no matter if we are talking about long, or short, term ones. Two examples come to mind, with Siding Goals being opposite for each. These happened to me.

In the first situation, I was in Cabo, having ridden my motorcycle down there. I had a couple of tequila’s at a restaurant about a block from my hotel and wanted to call it a night. Mexico has a law that requires you to have a helmet if you are on a bike. It apparently doesn’t specify that you have to be wearing it, but you have to have it on you. There were bikes everywhere and every one of them had helmets strapped to the back but no one was wearing one. Anyway, I got on my bike for the one block ride to my hotel, no helmet with me, and was immediately pulled over by the policia. I was informed of my infraction and told that I would have to go to the station and pay a fine. I was polite and friendly and told the officer that I was tired and I was sure he had better things to do than all of that paperwork (Common Enemy). I was happy to go with him, though, but, was there a way to pay the fine on site and avoid an inconvenience for us both? (Siding Goals) Then I apologized to him for breaking the law, asked him if he was a motorcycle enthusiast and mentioned how frustrating it must be to deal with clueless tourists all the time. I mentioned that I used to live in a tourist town and we talked about how annoying tourists could be. (Agreement). He had me follow him to a parking lot and we took care of the “fine” and I threw in an extra 100 pesos for my new “friend” as a “courtesy”. (Random Favor) At the end of the day, I rode away, still without a helmet, with very little drama.

 

Purchase the book now HERE

online

Subscribe below to get updates, limited edition versions, and more.

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required




Behavioral Programming Book

My latest book, Behavioral Programming; The Manipulation of Social Interaction, is now available through Amazon, and will soon be in the ITunes bookstore. This book comes from 6 years of research that started out as a program designed to enable  US Special Operations personel to acquire human assets  and solicit help quickly behind enemy lines.

Behavioral Programming book cover

 

Buy the EBook now HERE
Buy the paperback HERE
BH cover

Behavioral Programming is the only influence/manipulation/programming system out there that can work completely through multimedia only.  With this system of psychology you can alter a persons behavior entirely through texting!  No face to face is needed.  No human contact is needed.  No vocal exchange is needed for this to work completely.  In fact, often times it is advantageous to do so.  Think about this, many times when face to face with someone you have said something that you meant, but smiled, chuckled, and/or made a funny face while saying it.  That told the other person that you were embarrassed to say it and that you would not stick to it, you really didnt mean it.  Your body language and tone of voice gave away your weakness.  When you deliver programming via text messages, there is no self sabatage with those things because they are taken out of the picture.  You can say what you mean, and the other person will not be distracted by your physical antics that take meaning and seriousness away from your words.

Behavioral Programming works at the most basic natural and subconscious level to program behavior where it begins, in the brain.  What you say, and the context that you say it in has all the meaning.  Your tone of voice may help or hurt your true emphasis on your words, but is not needed at all.  You understand all the books you read without someone reading them to you, and they can to.  This system of psychoprogramming is so effective that it works through the air via phone text or email.  Using texting to program someone is like having a wireless router to their head for remote brain hacking.  It gives us the direct access we need to them without actually having to be with them or even see the person.

Nothing out there has been taught like this.  The human brain is a computer, learn to hack that and you can program it to do anything.  Learning the code is the key, and the code is Behavioral Programming.

@behavioralprog

#BehavioralProgramming

A special thank you to:

Dr. Abdullah Alwardi-Consulting

Dr. Jeff Jenkins-Consulting

Lee Andrews-Editing/marketing

My Wife-support

Allen Curry-artwork

Ty Cunningham-Technical assistance

Kevin Reeve-Developement/research/editing

Matthew Fiddler-Consulting